Shiri Pasternak

Essays and Chapters

Pasternak, S. “A Tale of Two Visions for Canada: The Trilateral Agreement versus the Land Claims Policy,” Aboriginal History: A Reader, 2nd Edition, Kristin Burnett and Geoff Read, eds., (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press), 2016.

Link: http://www.oupcanada.com/catalog/9780199015337.html

Review of:
The Comeback
John Ralston Saul
Penguin Canada
294 pages, hardcover
ISBN 9780670068739

Originally published in the Literary Review of Canada, January-February 2015

Link: http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2015/01/dont-call-it-a-comeback/

By Hayden King and Shiri Pasternak

While indigenous people keep resisting assimiliation, it’s Canada that needs to catch up.

The response to the Idle No More Movement has generally wavered between the dismissive and the laudatory. In the latter group, thinkers and writers have emerged to say that things are different now, potentially better. We are changing. Among these forecasters are Bob Rae, Bill Gallagher, Ken Coates, Douglas Bland, Lloyd Axworthy and now John Ralston Saul. They are here to warn you/us that there will be no stopping the phoenix-like re-emergence of Anishinaabeg, Haudenosaunee and, yes, Métis peoples (as well as many others).

Saul is among the most progressive of these non-Native (white) men. He is a political philosopher who is deeply convinced, as he has previously argued, that Canada’s founding myth is indigenous, rooted in the Métis civilization—our collective political culture born of anglophone, francophone and indigenous heritage. He has consistently submitted that the denial of this shared indigenous heritage is at the heart of our national ambiguity, discontent and even dysfunction.

(Read more…)

Dafnos, T. and Pasternak, S. “The Criminalization of Aboriginal Protests in Recent History and the Implications for Sovereignty Summer.” For the Defence: Criminal Lawyers’ Association Newsletter 34:3 (August 2013): 15-23.

Pasternak, S. “‘Canada Can’t Hide Genocide’: June 24 Day of Action for Indigenous Rights.” Drift & Surge, Root & Thorn: Travels in the Radical Midwest, Compass Collaborators, eds. (Michigan: White Wire, 2012)

Link: http://www.midwestradicalculturecorridor.net/?p=176

Pasternak, S. “Property in 3 Registers,” Scapegoat: Architecture, Landscape, Political Economy, Issue 00: Property, Fall 2010.

Link: http://www.scapegoatjournal.org/docs/00/00_Pasternak_PropertyInThreeRegisters.pdf

Pasternak, S. “They’re Clear-Cutting our Way of Life”: Algonquins Defend the Forest,” Upping the Anti (8) May 2009.

Link: http://uppingtheanti.org/journal/article/08-theyre-clear-cutting-our-way-of-life/

One of the most dangerous First Nations in Canada is a small community of around 250 Algonquins living in rural Québec. The threat they pose is so grave that the Canadian government has repeatedly intervened in their customary governance laws to put minority community factions in power. The Mitchikanibikok Inik, or Algonquins of Barriere Lake (ABL), have not taken up arms, nor do they occupy land near major transport arteries like Highway 401 that could be disrupted to costly economic effect. The danger posed by the ABL lies with a “Trilateral Agreement,” a co-management plan signed in the early 1990s that covers governance over the land, wildlife, and resources on 10,000 square kilometers of their unsurrendered traditional territory.

(Read more…)

Pasternak, S. “Colonialism: Canada’s Centuries Old Crisis,” They Call It Struggle for a Reason: Special Edition – the Economic Crisis, OCAP, May 2009.

Link: http://update.ocap.ca/node/725

Originally published in Progressive Planning Magazine

Link: http://www.plannersnetwork.org/2008/10/healing-abandonment-when-houses-have-no-people-and-people-have-no-houses-use-it-or-lose-it/

by Shiri Pasternak and David Wachsmuth

In Detroit, which is choking on tens of thousands of abandoned properties, the housing abandonment problem is easy to see but effective solutions are hard to imagine. In Toronto, the opposite is true. The abandonment problem, though real, is easy to miss, and effective solutions are available. This article briefly describes Abandonment Issues, a Toronto-based campaign for affordable housing. The campaign was built around a demand that the municipal government introduce a “Use It or Lose It” by-law meant to prevent housing abandonment and reclaim already abandoned buildings through targeted expropriations, for conversion to social housing. One year since its inception, and with the bulk of the groundwork over, we want to reflect critically on the successes and failures of the campaign from the point of view of academics working in the planning field.

(Read more…)

Pasternak, S. “Property, Power, Freedom,” Zmag, December 2006.

Pasternak, S. “A Trial by Biopower: Foucault, Sovereignty, and the Seed,” The Sinues of the Present Genealogies of Biopolitics: Conference Proceedings, University of Montreal, May 2005, published October 2005.